It’s Not Photoshop. These are Iconic Photographs Recreated as Miniature Models

When they aren’t creating high quality advertising photographs, Switzerland-based Jojakim Cortis and Adrian Sonderegger have been building impeccably detailed models of iconic photographs. Viewed from the same angle as the original photograph, you would almost swear these were Photoshopped. Like so many good (and crazy) ideas, this one began with a bit of fun:

“It started out as a joke,” Cortis told WIRED. “In our free time, when there’s no money coming in, we decided to try to recreate the most expensive pictures in the world.”

(Above: Making of “Lakehurst”)

Cortis and Sonderegger began simply in 2012, working to make a model of the second most expensive photograph ever sold: Andreas Gursky’s Rhein II. Ironically, although the model they made was not Photoshopped, the original image absolutely was. Gursky removed dog-walkers and a factory building to create the empty landscape which sold for $4.3 million at auction in 1999.

Now the two photographer/sculptors have moved on to creating images which have long intrigued the world: the last image of the Titanic afloat, the Hindenburg exploding in flames, Tank Man in Tiananmen Square. Each image is impressively recreated and photographed, with some results even surpassing the vintage image in quality. See more of the series at ohnetitel.ch.

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The original photograph by Sam Shere, 1937

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Making of “The last photo of the Titanic afloat”

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Francis Browne’s photograph. The last image of the Titanic afloat. 1912.

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Making of “Tiananmen”

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“Tank Man” by Stuart Franklin, 1989

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Making of “The Wright Brothers”

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Photograph by John Thomas Daniels, 1903

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Making of “Nessie”

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Photograph by Marmaduke Wetherell, 1934

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Making of “Five Soldiers Silhouette at the Battle of Broodseinde”

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“Five Soldiers Silhouette at the Battle of Broodseinde” by Ernest Brooks, 1917

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Making of “Concorde”

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Photograph by Toshihiko Sato, 2000

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Making of “AS11-40-5878″

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Photograph by Edwin “Buzz” Aldrin, 1969

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